Past Event

Energy Economics & Finance Seminar

WednesdaySeptember 23, 2020 4:00 - 5:00 PM Kleinman | Free Event
Location
Zoom Webinar
United States
US
Contact Information

If you are interested in attending, please contact:

Jen Jones (jennifjo@wharton.upenn.edu)

  • Frank Diebold
    Penn Econ

WATCH THE RECORDING


This seminar series in Energy Economics & Finance (EEF) is organized by Arthur van Benthem and hosted by the Kleinman Center.

The scope of the seminar includes regulation and policy papers. The scope of the seminar also includes environmental and transportation issues, as long as there is a connection with energy. Sessions are biweekly on Wednesdays (see dates below) from 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Please register for detail for how to join to webinar. 

To register: email Jen Jones to recieve the zoom log-in information. 

Fall 2020 Schedule: 

  • 9/9 Susanna Berkouwer (Wharton BEEP)
  • 9/23 Frank Diebold (Penn Econ)
  • 10/7 Arthur van Benthem (Wharton BEPP)
  • 10/21 Louis Preonas (Maryland)
  • 11/4 Jacquelyn Pless (MIT Sloan)
  • 11/18 Jim Archsmith (Maryland)

Seminar Information: 

Title: "Probability Assessments of an Ice-Free Arctic: Comparing Statistical and Climate Model Projections"

Abstract: The downward trend in Arctic sea ice is a key factor determining the pace and intensity of future global climate change; moreover, declines in sea ice can have a wide range of additional environmental and economic consequences. Based on several decades of satellite data, we provide statistical forecasts of Arctic sea ice extent during the rest of this century. The best fitting statistical model indicates that sea ice is diminishing at an increasing rate. By contrast, average projections from the CMIP5 global climate models foresee a gradual slowing of sea ice loss even in high carbon emissions scenarios. Our long-range statistical projections also deliver probability assessments of the timing of an ice-free Arctic. This analysis indicates almost a 60 percent chance of an effectively ice-free Arctic Ocean in the 2030s – much earlier than the average projection from global climate models.

This event is a part of Climate Week at Penn
 

Climate Week at Penn